Nature,  science

“Bioluminescence” that creates color patterns in life

It’s hard to imagine a lizard emitting a very attractive little light at night. Even so, owning one is still beyond the reach of the average person.

It has been scientifically proven that lizards as well as many other species of animals and plants produce light in this way under various environmental conditions around the world. This process is commonly referred to as “bioluminescence”. It is a very strange biological process.

It’s hard to imagine a lizard emitting a very attractive little light at night. Even so, owning one is still beyond the reach of the average person.

It has been scientifically proven that lizards as well as many other species of animals and plants produce light in this way under various environmental conditions around the world. This process is commonly referred to as “bioluminescence”. It is a very strange biological process.

In addition, parts of living organisms that do not produce a biofluorescent beam of their own, but have biofluorescence, have also been identified in the biosphere. They create their light through what they eat or by building a symbiotic relationship with another organism. Biodiversity is achieved by feeding on a species of fish called Midshipman and a species of shrimp called Seed Shrimp. It is also said that squid develop a bioavailability by following a principle of symbiosis with bacteria of the genus Biofluorescence.

The combination of luciferin and luciferous enzymes affects many biofluidic processes. But, as mentioned earlier, in some cases the enzyme photoprotein is added instead of the enzyme luciferous. But it is not enough for these two compounds alone to be active to complete the biodegradation process. Binding with a calcium ion must also take place for this whole process to be completed.

Since photoproteins have recently been identified, biologists and chemists are conducting further research on its unusual chemical properties. Photoproteins were first discovered in crystal jellyfish found off the west coast of North America.

Biodegradable colors

Scientists claim that there is a very large spectrum of organisms that have been identified so far with bioluminescence. Many marine biofuels produce clearly visible blue-green hues. These are the colors that are most clearly visible in the deep ocean floor. Also, most marine life is sensitive to blue-green to red-yellow colors.

Among terrestrial biofilms, lizards and the only biofilm snail found in Southeast Asia produce a yellow color. Several other small organisms are capable of producing more than one color of biofluid. Railroad worms emit a red light through the head and a green light from the trunk.

Some species emit continuous biofluorescent light. Fungi that grow on decaying pieces of wood thus emit a continuous light. The foremost of these is the fungus Firefox. But most organisms emit biofluorescent light for 1-10 seconds at a time. That light is emitted only through specific parts of the organism’s body. But there are times when this light emanates from the whole body of some living beings.

Adaptation

Bioluminescence is not a random phenomenon of nature. Biofluorescent organisms utilize it in many ways. In some cases, it contributes to vital biological processes, such as hunting, protection from predators, and finding a mate.
Security adaptation

Some organisms use bioluminescence to repel predators. Many species of squid produce biodegradable colors to surprise predators. The predator tries to escape the squid within a short time of being disturbed. Squid species that live close to the surface of the ocean can be deceived by predators with a paint-like solution, but in squid living in deep, dark seas, ink production is minimal. For this reason, when a vampire squid encounters a predator in the deep sea, it emits a biodegradable mucus (mucus-like membrane) from its body and the predator flees in shock.

Some predators hunt from the depths of the ocean to close to the surface of the ocean. The sun’s rays provide easy targets for sharks, such as sharks, who hunt from the depths of the ocean. But some biofilms have a strategy to avoid this. By producing light similar to that of the sun on the underside of their bodies, they have the ability to hide from predators hunting from the depths of the ocean, by erasing their shadow. Hatchfish are a very successful follower of this tactic.

Other organisms biodegradate one part of their body to isolate it and repel predators. The brittle star-like creature enlivens a part of its body, such as its arm, and escapes dangerously as the predator chases after it. Each time an arm is removed, the arm grows back.

In addition, although sharks and whales are not biofuels, biofilms are used as a means of obtaining their food. Sperm are sometimes explored in search of a biodegradable flora colony. But plankton sperm are not included in the diet of whales. When a predator invades a plankton colony, the plankton emits a bright light. Sperm whales are not predators, but predators. This makes it easier for these whales to find food.

In addition, some insect species use biofluorescence to repel predators, implying that they are poisonous.
Hunting adaptation

Hunting creatures can also be seen making good use of bioluminescence. Anglerfish occupy a prominent place among them. The light is emitted from a long, thin fleshy filament that rises above their head. The small fish that are attracted to this light become the food of the anglerfish.

Gravity adaptation

Bioluminescence is also used as a breeding tactic. Lizards often shed their biological light to find a mate. It helps to select a suitable mate for mating as both males and females emit bio-fluorescent light.

In addition to all of the above adaptations, some organisms emit biofluorescent light even when the environment changes. Some algae glow when there is a change in the salt concentration of the water.

Bioluminescence and man

Scientists are researching how bioluminescence can be used for human benefit. A number of experimental researches are being carried out in this regard. Experiments on city and highway lighting through the production of biofluorescent plants are already underway. If successful, it can reduce excessive power consumption.

In addition, research has shown that certain grains or plants have the potential to be used as a means of communication, to inform when water or other nutrients are needed, and to inform them that harvest time has arrived.

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